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Dubai inaugurated its metro network in September 2009, becoming the first urban metro network to run in the Gulf’s Arab states. The system has eased the daily commute for thousands of the workers in the emirate.

With an economy increasingly based upon financial services, air transport, property development and tourism, Dubai has a rapidly growing population and severe traffic congestion problems. The population is forecast to increase by 6.4% annually, rising to three million by 2017.

“In full operation, Dubai Metro is projected to carry approximately 1.2 million passengers on an average day, and 355 million passengers a year.”

Dubai Municipality identified the need for a rail system to relieve growing motor traffic levels and support continuing urban development based on studies which began in 1997. Systra was awarded the preliminary engineering contract, and Dubai Rail Link (DURL), a consortium of four companies headed by Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), led the project to build the first two lines of the high-tech driverless rapid transit system. The other consortium members are the Japanese Obayashi and Kajima corporations, as well as Yapi Merkezi of Turkey.

The metro will be fully integrated within the network operated by the Roads & Transport Authority (RTA), a body created in 2005. Routes will be organised around the backbone provided by the rail system.

Around 1.74 million passengers used the metro in its first month, according to the statistics released by the RTA. The average number of passengers travelling on the Red Line is estimated at around 180,000 a day. Green Line passenger capacity is estimated to be 100,000 a day.

The Red Line was the first line to be completed, in April 2010. The Green line was opened in September 2011. Two more lines are planned. The intention is for 320km of metro lines to be in place in Dubai by 2020. Dubai Metro is the longest automated driverless system in the world.

DURL officials are also in the process of negotiations with major local and international companies for acquiring brand naming rights – in other words, advertisement rights – for the stations on Red and Green lines.

In February 2012 the Dubai Metro entered the Guinness World Records book as the longest driverless metro network in the world, spanning 74.69km.

Dubai Metro network early stages and gradual station openings

Groundworks began in February 2006, centred on the 52.1km Red line. As of April 2012 all 29 stations on the Red Line have been inaugurated. Eight of the Red line stations were opened in September 2009. Two stations were opened in January 2010.

Station construction stalled temporarily due to payment disputes – worth $2-3bn – between DURL and its contractors, but resumed in February 2010. Seven more stations opened in April 2010, followed by another three in May 2010 and five in October 2010. Two more stations were opened in March 2011.

In August 2006, a second contract worth $12bn was awarded to the MHI consortium for building the Green line. The Green line runs between Al-Qusais and Al-Jadaf, and links strategic locations including Dubai Airport and Healthcare City. In June 2007, Serco (operator of the Docklands Light Railway in London) was named as preferred bidder for initial consultation and the system’s operation and maintenance.

The Green line was initially planned to open in March 2010, but this was subsequently postponed to September 2011.

Infrastructure and routes of the emirate’s Red and Green lines

The 52.1km Red line has 29 stations, four of which are underground. The line runs from Al-Rashidiya to Jebel Ali and passes the American University of Dubai. It serves an estimated 32,000 passengers an hour. There are plans to extend the Red Line by 15.5km, a move which would add six stations to the route.

The 23km Green line has 18 stations, two of which are transfer stations shared with the Red line. The route is extended to serve the Deira and Bur Dubai central areas, up to the Burjuman and Wafi shopping centres. An 11km extension to the Green line has been proposed, to cover the route between Al-Jadaf and International City station.

The routes run underground in the city centre: from the Sheikh Rashid / Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed intersection to the Salahuddin / Abu Bakr Al Siddique intersection on the Red line, and from Garhoud to Oud Metha Road on the Green line.

Elsewhere, trains run on elevated viaducts designed to enhance the urban architecture along the route. The tracks do not cross highways at any point, ensuring full mode segregation. Although taxi, bus and water taxi feeder services were structured to encourage end-to-end use of public transport, the RTA created three park-and-ride sites, the largest of which has 6,000 places.

Underground works have been carried out without affecting buildings. A third-rail power supply was chosen to avoid the visual intrusion of overhead line equipment. All stations, elevated or underground, feature platform screen doors for passenger safety and to facilitate air conditioning.

RTA has introduced ‘feeder bus routes’ to allow commuters to travel from major locations in and around stations. Drop-off zones and a bus and taxi lay-by have also been constructed outside of each station. To further reduce the area’s reliance upon road transport, the authority is considering adding 268km of light rail lines which will serve as feeders to the Dubai Metro.

Rolling stock orders for the first urban metro network in the region

The driverless, fully automated trains are fully air-conditioned and designed to meet Dubai’s specific requirements. Unusual for metro operation, the trains offer standard ‘silver’ class areas, a women and children-only section, plus a first-class ‘gold’ section (a carriage for VIPs). The five-car sets are approximately 75m long, seating around 400 passengers but with standing room for many more.

Rolling stock is being supplied by Kinki Sharyo under a $456.2m contract for 385 cars, the first of which arrived from Japan in March 2008. A total of 87 five-car trains were acquired by the RTA, with 62 used on the Red line and 25 on the Green line. This will gradually be increased to 106 trains.

Storage and maintenance needs to take place undercover due to the heat and dust conditions in Dubai. The main depot is at Al-Rashidiya, and has a capacity for 64 trains. Auxiliary depots are at Jebel Ali and Al-Qusais.

The trains have a maximum speed of 90km/hr, forming a round trip of two hours and 23 minutes for the Red line and one hour and 23 minutes for the Green line.

Signalling and communications along Dubai’s Metro system

The fully automated signalling and communication system is being supplied by Thales Rail Signalling Solutions. The automatic train control system allows headways of between 90 seconds and two minutes.

In 2005, MHI contracted Alcatel (now Alcatel-Lucent) to supply the driverless train control system and a communications system for on-train video surveillance, passenger information, public addresses and the integrated control centre. Trains are Wi-Fi enabled.

The system’s control centre is at the Al-Rashidiya depot. The project’s signalling system is moving block and fully automated with in-cab signalling.

Emergency call boxes and LED systems developed by Trantek are fixed in the trains.

Future for Dubai’s Metro project, expansions and new lines

In full operation, Dubai Metro is projected to carry approximately 1.2 million passengers on an average day, and 355 million passengers a year.

“Dubai inaugurated its metro network in September 2009, becoming the first urban metro network to run in the Gulf’s Arab states.”

Operating costs, including staff, maintenance and power, should be approximately AED570m a year. This is expected to be met through fares and additional revenues such as advertisement space and joint development.

In May 2007, the 49km Purple line received approval, moving ahead of another future projection, the Blue line. Parsons Brinckerhoff has been contracted for initial design work on the express eight-station line from Dubai International Airport to Al Maktoum International Airport along Al Khail Road.

Construction is yet to begin on the line. Dubai airport has raised concerns as the line also has three check-in facilities which hamper passenger traffic.

The 47km Blue line will link the current international airport with the new Dubai World Central International Airport, which is being built at Jebel Ali, as part of a transport hub. Construction of this line will commence in 2012 and is expected to be completed by 2014.

In April 2008, the RTA announced that the development of the Yellow line, a light rail operation, would be carried out by a consortium including Serco and Alstom.

Article Source : railway-technology.com/

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Major Challenges of Setting up a Secured Cloud Computing Environment (And it’s Solutions)

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The twenty-first century brought with itself great advances in computing and technology. Of these, Cloud Computing has been one of the most dominant ones. By offering pooling of resources, a wide network access, on-demand self-service, measured service, and flexibility, it has emerged as a preferred alternative for storing information and utilizing assets across a network. Further, it is available to users in various models like PaaS or Platform as a Service, IaaS or Infrastructure as a Service, and SaaS or Software as a Service. Today, we will explore the major challenges of setting up a secure cloud computing environment and offer some workable solutions around them.

Security-Related Challenges while setting up a Cloud Computing Environment

  • The possibility of a data breach
  • Vulnerability to DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack
  • The need to ensure that information flows across the entire network in a secured manner
  • Management of vulnerabilities or bugs in the system
  • User account getting hijacked
  • Presence of APT parasites
  • Factors leading to the loss of data
  • Risks associated with multiple tenants of the cloud
  • Interfaces or APIs getting hacked

If we were to sum it up, then ensuring a secure Cloud Computing network would involve taking all the security measures for an on-site server in addition to Cloud-related security measures. Let’s look at some ways in which you can manage the security challenges.

1. A written document about the Security Policies

Before availing the services of a Cloud provider, make sure that you ask him to share a written document which details the policies and plan pertaining to the security of the Cloud. This will help you understand the approach towards security and offer an assurance about the priority assigned by the provider to the security of his services.

2. Introduce Multi-factor authentication

While all user accounts have a password, it is usually not enough to secure their accounts. Hence, it is necessary to have multi-factor authentication set up to keep hijacking at bay. Apart from the password, the users must input an OTP as an added layer of security.

3. Encryption and Security Tools

This is a no-brainer. Use the latest available encryption technology, antivirus, and antimalware tools. You can also introduce a firewall if necessary.

4. Regular Backups

Backups are the fall-back option in case of any disaster. While most cloud providers offer a backup option as a part of their services, it is important to regularly take your own backup too. If you are making a lot of changes to the system every day, then you must back up on a daily basis too. And remember, your backups need encryption as well.

5. Choice of the Cloud model

There are many types of Cloud models available today like private clouds, public clouds, multi-cloud systems, and hybrid clouds. You must choose the model which is best suited to your activities. For example, if your cloud computing system would deal with a lot of critical and confidential information and low volumes, then a private cloud would be ideal for you. On the other hand, if the data is not so confidential and the volumes are very high, then you might want to opt for a public cloud. A hybrid cloud and multi-cloud systems offer you the flexibility to create a computing environment tailored to your needs.

Conclusion

Cloud computing is used in an array of services like Cloud storage platforms, Cloud Hosting services, Cloud communication systems, etc. In many cases, the entire organisation’s data relies on the security of the Cloud environment. Follow these tips and ensure that your cloud computing environment is secure. Do let us know about the tools that you use to keep your Cloud environment secure in the comments section below.

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What Are the Ways You Can Recover Files from The Recycle Bin?

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Recover Files from The Recycle Bin

If you have accidentally deleted your important files, then recycle bin is the only hope left to recover them.  You can locate your file when it has not been completely deleted by you. One of the most relieving things is that the file pointer even after getting deleted continues to be present on the hard drive. This happens even after emptying the Recycle Bin. To help you in the recovery process, we are providing you step by step instructions that will help you easily recover your deleted files from the system.

How does the file get restored when emptied the recycle bin?

Whenever you delete any file, it goes to the Recycle Bin. By right clicking on the deleted file, you can restore it back to its original location. However, the case complicates when you accidentally empty the entire Recycle Bin content? Now how to recover deleted file?

Recovery of the deleted file is still possible. Even on emptying the Recycle Bin, the reference of the master file gets removed but not the data. So, it is important to perform the file recovery steps from empty recycle bin. There are a few manual steps stated below that when implemented would lead to recovery of the file.  

Restore from its previous versions

  • Go to the folder from which you deleted the file. Right click on it
  • Now choose the option “Restore earlier versions”
  • Select the desired previous version and click on “Restore” option
  • In this way recover file from bin manually

Switch on “System Protection”

This is another way to recover your deleted files from earlier versions.

  • Visit Control Panel
  • Now choose system and click “System Protection” located in the right window
  • The system will provide a listing of all the available hard disk drives with protection
  • Choose the specific drive and then click on “configure”
  • Choose “Restore system settings and earlier file versions”
  • Click on OK and recover your lost file.

Restore using Windows Backup

You can even recover your file using the Backup utility of Windows OS. To restore data from your backup, you will need to perform below mentioned steps, such as

  • Click on Control Panel and then choose “System and Security
  • Click on “Restore my files”
  • There are a few easy steps that you need to follow to ultimately recover your deleted file

Use a trusted file recovery software

You can use a file recovery software to recover your data even when it is not found in the bin. Data recovery software for Windows comes with powerful abilities to reliably and efficiently recover files data from corrupted and formatted storage devices, emptied Recycle Bin, and inaccessible partitions.

Regardless of the type of data, this file recovery software lets you recover your lost valuable photos, music, video and other critical documents. By safely download and installing this software, you can get your deleted files recovered.

Conclusion

Till your file does not get overwritten or completely deleted from the system, it can be recovered. All these above steps would assist you in recovering deleted files from emptied recycle bin.

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