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This is a moment of speaking out and freaking out. Today’s off-the-cuff comment is tomorrow’s outrage, and in a world where everyone is a brand, one of the weapons of choice has become the consumer boycott.

Recently Kanye West spurred calls for a boycott of Adidas, his sneaker partner, when he announced in an interview that 400 years of slavery “sounds like a choice.” When Donna Karan put her foot in it on the red carpet after the Weinstein sexual harassment revelations by wondering if women were “asking” for trouble because of how they dressed, a petition was circulated on Care2 for Nordstrom and Macy’s to drop DKNY (even though Ms. Karan had not been associated with the brand since 2015).

Calls to boycott the Ivanka Trump brand by the group #GrabYourWallet began after Donald Trump’s leaked comments about grabbing women in a sexually aggressive manner and continued after Mr. Trump became president (even though Ms. Trump had also stepped away from her brand, after the election).

Dolce & Gabbana even made it an official meta-trend by creating #BoycottDolce&Gabbana T-shirts after a movement had begun to — yes, boycott the brand thanks to its relationship with Melania Trump, the first lady.

Karl Lagerfeld, the longtime creative director of Chanel and Fendi and founder of a namesake brand, is known to be “the greatest talker in Paris since Oscar Wilde,” or so said Godfrey Deeny, the global editor of the Fashion Network. But while he can be terrifically quotable and entertaining, he also has a tendency to utter outrageous things. And lately, that type of comment seems to be escalating.

Last week, Mr. Lagerfeld gave an interview to the French newspaper Le Point in which he said he was considering renouncing his German citizenship because of the one million Muslim immigrants that Angela Merkel, the chancellor, had accepted into Germany, a decision he linked to the rise of neo-Nazism in the country.

The comment made the German newspapers, and followed similar statements Mr. Lagerfeld made last year on a French television talk show in which he said, “One cannot — even if there are decades between them — kill millions of Jews so you can bring millions of their worst enemies in their place.”

That declaration came just after Mr. Lagerfeld, an accomplished cartoonist, had drawn a sketch for the German paper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung of Adolf Hitler thanking Chancellor Merkel for inadvertently allowing the far-right party into parliament. Which itself came before another interview, with the French magazine Numéro, in which Mr. Lagerfeld dismissed the #MeToo movement and asserted, “If you don’t want your pants pulled about, don’t become a model.”

It’s as if he’s sticking his finger in the light socket to see what will happen.

But here’s what does: not much.

Every time Mr. Lagerfeld makes an incendiary statement, there’s a flurry of upset online, but it is contained, focused on him and not the brands that employ and enable him. There is no call for a boycott of Chanel, Fendi or even his namesake label. The companies themselves don’t even bother to issue the now seemingly de rigueur “We don’t agree, but he is his own person and has a right to his views.” They just tuck their heads in and have no comment, or don’t respond. How come?

There is no doubt that Mr. Lagerfeld occupies a singular space in the style universe. He is someone who has shaped the fashion industry as we know it (and our wardrobes as we know them), alongside names like Giorgio Armani and Rei Kawakubo, and is probably about as close to a living legend as exists in fashion.

A certain tolerance of idiosyncrasy goes along with that — a certain “Oh, it’s just old Uncle Fester doing his thing” — as well as fear when it comes to criticizing the power player in the room. Especially when that power player works for a brand, like Chanel, that is enshrined on a power pedestal.

Indeed, a friend who privately expressed outrage over Mr. Lagerfeld also said: “Don’t quote me, please. I don’t want to lose my fifth row seat at Chanel.” When Sara Ziff, the founder of the Model Alliance, spoke out against Mr. Lagerfeld’s comments on models, she said she received a lot of support via direct messaging from contacts — who then said they could not make their feelings public.

Still, no brand in untouchable. Last May Chanel came under fire in Australia for cultural appropriation after it created a $1,325 Chanel boomerang, and was forced to make a quasi apology, announcing “it was not our intention to disrespect the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.”

And just because the fashion world quivers in its stilettos at the idea of calling time, that doesn’t mean the consuming public should. Which suggests that there is something else going on, and it may have as much to do with the current cultural and political reality as the boycotts do.

Yes, I am talking about Mr. Trump.

As with the president and his tweets, Mr. Lagerfeld has been saying outrageous things so regularly for so long and with such gumption, everyone is numb to the substance. It’s almost expected; he has positioned himself as a provocateur; it’s part of his brand.

And before you can really digest one statement, he is on to the next, all of it said with enough volume and certainty to clear a way through the excess chatter in its path. (Kanye West does this, too, but doesn’t get away with it quite so often.)

We seem to be living in a weird dual reality. Just as we have become more sensitized to the experience of different social groups, we are also more inured to the growth of uncivil discourse, wherever it may originate, on Fox or in fashion.

Still, when it comes to fashion, Mr. Deeny thinks there are at least signs of change. “It was striking that after Chanel’s most recent cruise show, staff informed journalists at the after-party inside the massive cruise liner in the Grand Palais that they could ‘seulement saluer,’ or only greet, Karl and not ask him any questions,” he said, noting that this had the result of minimizing the risk of what Mr. Lagerfeld might say.

“After 25 years of meeting Karl before and after shows for WWD, Vogue Hommes, Le Figaro and now Fashion Network, I cannot remember the last time that ever happened.”

Original Posted : Nytimes

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Tips to Buy Best Spa Chair For Your Salon

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Are you opening a spa or salon? Well, you need to get everything on the right place right from interiors, types of equipment, designing and others to give it the best look. The main equipment in a spa is the pedicure chair, so what kind of chair are you looking for? It is always better to figure out what kind of chairs suit your salon or what features are you expecting.

Normally, people having experience working in a spa think of opening their own spa. So, they would be knowing the features that are very necessary for a spa chair. Note down all such features and then begin the search in different companies to get the best deal.

From Where to Buy

Today pedicure chairs come in different colors and even the foot bowls also come in matching color. Now, the most important part is from where will you buy the chair? Definitely, it should be a reputed company having an exclusive showroom or online store. Select the company that has good customer service record and who are easily reachable through phone or email.

Normally, Pedicure chairs will be costly, so you need to communicate with customer service representative to get complete information on the features of the chair and know the procedure to book for a service or repairs.

Brand of the Chair

Let it be any item you purchase, the brand value is always important. Costly items like spa chair should be bought from an international or reputed brand. A reputed manufacturer will always give you high-quality chairs that will be durable for a longer period and even the cost of maintenance will be on the lower side.

Pedicure chairs manufactured by the reputed companies may cost little higher than inferior quality chairs, but a good chair will also enhance the reputation of your salon and business.

Warranty and Replacement

A reliable and reputed company will always provide you with the best pedicure chairs that come with a warranty. It is important that the item you purchase after shedding a high amount should be cover under some kind of security. Every reputed company will provide warranty for longer duration and will have service centers in every city to serve their loyal customers.

Always go for the brands that have customer service center in your nearby locality, so that you can get services like repairs, replacements, and maintenance flawlessly.

The above-mentioned tips will definitely help you in selecting the best pedicure chair for your salon. Always remember to call a professional and licensed electrician to get your chairs installed.

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Everyone in Cartagena Is Wearing This Perfect Summer Dress

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Summer Dress

If you’re lucky enough to travel to Cartagena, Colombia, this summer, be prepared to see one dress in particular on every in-the-know, stylish woman. On my recent trip to the beautiful Caribbean city, I asked Colombian designer Silvia Tcherassi which one of her dresses is the most popular in her Cartagena boutique, and she was quick to respond: the Selvino Dress ($2500).

“The Selvino Dress is one of the most versatile pieces I’ve ever made; it’s a new classic,” Tcherassi told Who What Wear. “You can go from casual to party with a simple change of accessories. Some people arrive to Cartagena thinking that it is another tourist destination and never imagine that the women dress up at night to go to restaurants and then to the club. They see this dress in the window of my boutique or posted in Instagram and fall in love immediately. Also, its fluid silhouette and bright color match perfect with the city—and then you can wear it effortlessly in Santa Monica or Saint-Tropez, day or night.”

Harper’s Bazaar España contributing editor Sofía Paramio Delgado, below, is just one of the chic women who have worn the dress in Cartagena—you can see for yourself just how well it blends in. Although Paramio’s yellow version promptly sold out on Net-a-Porter, the dress is still available in black-and-white, so get clicking. Scroll down to see the dress in question and shop the brand.

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